THAILAND: THE LARGEST DINOSAUR REMAINS

 

THAILAND: THE LARGEST DINOSAUR REMAINS

Dinosaurs are a diverse group of  from the clade of dinosauria. They first appeared during the Triassic period, between 243 and 233.23 million years ago, although the exact origin and timing of dinosaur evolution is the subject of active research. It became the dominant terrestrial vertebrate after the Triassic-Jurassic extinction event 201.3 million years ago; Their dominance continued throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. The fossil record shows that birds are modern, feathered dinosaurs that evolved from earlier theropods during the late Jurassic, and are the only dinosaur lineage to survive the Cretaceous and Paleogene extinctions about 66 million years ago. So dinosaurs can be divided into dinosaurs or birds. and extinct non-avian dinosaurs, all of which were non-avian dinosaurs.

On this day in 2016 in Chaiyaphum Province, Thailand’s Department of Mineral Resources discovered a dinosaur fossil estimated to be 100 million years old and believed to be the largest herbivorous dinosaur fossil found in Thailand or Southeast Asia.

While out and about, one of the residents noticed something quite unusual – huge bones. Contact the authorities, who then revealed more than 20 individual fragments of the sacrum, pelvis, spine and femur all belonging to a single species of sauropod titanosauriform estimated to be 23 to 30 meters (about 74 to 98 feet) long.

 Today, Doodle for Google celebrates “The discovery of the largest dinosaur remains in Thailand “was discovered on this day in the country six years ago.

Thailand’s Mineral Resources Department has discovered the remains of a dinosaur that is about 100 million years old, and it is also believed to be the largest herbivorous dinosaur fossil found in Thailand or Southeast Asia.

Scientists believe that the bones of a Brontosaurus-like sauropod with its long neck and tail can be traced back to a previously discovered species called Phuwiangosaurus sirindhornae, but the remains could also point to an entirely new species – which would be the largest that roamed Thailand in the Cretaceous period.

For the first time, after a local resident noticed an unusually huge bone, he contacted the authorities. Thailand authorities unearthed more than “20 individual fragments of the sacrum, pelvis, spine and femur all belonging to a single species of sauropod titanosauror estimated to be anywhere between 23 to 30 metres (approximately 74 to 98 feet)! “

To celebrate the “discovery of the remains of Thailand’s largest dinosaur”, a special doodle is now featured on the Google homepage specifically in Thailand.

Phuwiangosaurus is believed to be a member of the Euhelopodidae and is therefore similar to Euhelopus

Thailand has extensive Mesozoic exposures from both marine and non-marine environments. So far, team members believe that the largest dinosaur known in Thailand will be Phuwiangosaurus (P. sirindhornae), which is estimated to have reached about twenty meters.

Dinosaur fossils were first discovered in the country in 1973, during uranium surveys at Phu Wiang (now in Wiang Kao District) in Khon Kaen Province, leading to a flurry of dinosaur research by Thai and French academics and increasing public interest in the field. Since then many new dinosaur species have been described from several locations in the northeast, and paleontology museums have been established. Continuous research is mainly carried out by DMR and some universities, as well as other public and private institutions.

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